Medication (prescriptions) – acute & repeats

Practice Leads

  • Doctors: Jaz Dhilon
  • Pharmacist: Sadia Khan

Date Reviewed

11 Dec 2015

Date of Next Review

September 2017

If you are a patient looking for information about how to order a repeat prescription, then you have come to the wrong page.   This page is for doctors and staff at Ashcroft Surgery and it outlines the procedure for us to follow when you make a request for repeat medication.  Please click the link below which will take you directly to our page for patients on how to order a repeat prescription.   Ashcroft Surgery staff - if you would like to see what patients are told about ordering a repeat prescription, also click on the link below.

Flowchart for admin staff

All prescription requests will be ready within 48 hours (2 working days).  The process is outline below.  A prescription request will only be delayed if of a complicated nature and the doctor is having to complete additional checks or waiting to then see the patient at an available appointment slot..

The aims of this policy

  • To standardise repeat prescribing processes
  • Understand the acute prescribing process
  • To enable staff (admin, doctors, pharmacists and nurses) to understand their roles and responsibilities around acute and repeat prescribing
  • To make users aware of a good repeat prescribing process and procedures
  • To ensure safeguards are in place to minimise error and reduce risk

When a patient asks for an acute prescription....

Patients should not be making request for a repeat of acute prescriptions given in the past.  If they do, pass this onto the doctor.  See the section below under ADMIN FAQS - What to do if a patient asks for a medication not on their repeats.

It's not just the doctor's responsibility!

The production of repeat prescriptions is a team approach with input not only from the doctor or nurse prescriber, but also from other members of the healthcare team to produce high standards of practice and care.   If other people don't do their bit, then mistakes happen and ultimately, it is the patient that suffers.  So, please do your bit.

Our Prescribing Formulary

This formularly is not exhaustive and not comprehensive.  In fact, it's quite short.   The intention is to synchronise what the doctors prescribe at the practice for common conditions based on  group discussion of best practice, NICE guidelines and cost vs. benefit.  This formulary is reviewed once a year at a PLT meeting which includes our in-house pharmacist.

 

processing a repeat prescription request - flowchart

 

How quickly will we turn around acute & repeat prescription requests?

  • Repeat prescriptions - as detailed in the practice leaflet, all prescription requests will be ready within 48 hours (2 working days).  The process is outline above.  A prescription request will only be delayed if of a complicated nature and the doctor is having to complete additional checks or waiting to then see the patient at an available appointment slot..
  • Acute prescriptions - patients should not be making request for a repeat of acute prescriptions given in the past.   If they do, pass it onto the doctor to decide.

Review of our prescribing

The practice meets with the our in-house pharmacist at least once per year to review our prescribing behaviour for all of acutes, repeats and medication for chronic disease.  It is at this meeting where our Prescribing Formulary is reviewed and necessary changes made in line with good practice..    This annual meeting is completed as part of the practice weekly PLT programme and  recorded within the Practice PLT meetings plan

The 8 stages in the Repeat Prescribing Process

  1. Authorisation -  where the doctor initially puts a medication on repeat
  2. Medication request- the patient requests he repeat medication via the repeat script (preferred) or electronically. Only in exceptional circumstances will we accept telephone requests.
  3. Admin check medical records for compliance and review dates
  4. Admin print the prescription. If all is okay, admin staff print of the prescription and hand over to doctor; if all is NOT okay, admin staff highlight any prescriptions of concern, keep these in a separate pile and then hand these over to the doctor.
  5. Doctor does a medication review (and read codes it)
  6. Doctor re-authorises and updates review date (as necessary) on SystmOne.
  7. Doctor signs the prescription and hands it back to admin staff.
  8. Prescription storage - admin staff place the prescription in a secure holding area until patient arrives to pick it up.

Most of the information from these pages is adapted from the document 'Repeat Prescribing Guidelines' by Rachel Urban (v.11, Bradford)

More on the 8 stages

FAQs for admin

FAQs for doctors

2 Comments

  1. Maurita Liptrot on 6,August, 2016 at 5:31 pm

    isn’t authorization misspelled in your article?



    • DocMehay on 22,October, 2016 at 6:05 pm

      Are you American by any chance? We spell it as authorisation in the United Kingdom.